Guyanese Girl

Keisha.Adams

01 Aug: She Rocks! L.Y.F.T.S. Founder Keshia Adams Is On a Mission To Reduce Poverty

It’s said that true charity begin at home and Keshia Adams is determined not to keep it there.  The Brooklyn-Based Executive Director/Founder of Lifting You For Tomorrow’s Success (L.Y.F.T.S) is on a mission to break the cycle of poverty for families in her community and in Guyana.  L.Y.F.T.S. is a  non-profit organization that tackles many social problems like poverty, at-risk youth, and hunger. Another passion of Keshia is the The Adams Project (T.A.P.); a subsection of L.Y.F.T. that…

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29 Jul: Why I Now Embrace Vision Boards….

I’ve had an ongoing  love-hate relationship with vision boards ever since I created my first one about 9 years ago.  Most people say they work, but a little voice inside was always telling me that they were kind of silly, so I never fully embraced the idea I was inspired to create my first  board after watching a tv show, but I don’t recall putting much effort into it or even hanging it up anywhere. …

LalitaEtwaroo

25 Jul: Guyanese Lalita Etwaroo is Running for New York State Assembly in District 33

As we watch more and more women throwing their hats into today’s political arena during these highly polarizing times, Lalita Etwaroo is gearing up to challenge Democratic incumbent Clyde Vanel for a New York State Assembly Legislative seat.  Born in Georgetown, Guyana, the recent college graduate is a Republican candidate for NY State Assembly in the 33rd District, which covers the neighborhoods of Cambria Heights, St. Albans, Hollis, Queens Village, Bellerose and parts of Floral Park…

Nubya Garcia

21 Jul: She Rocks! Meet Nubya Garcia, Award Winning Jazz Saxophonist & Composer

London-based saxophonist and composer, Nubya Garcia, is one of the leading forces behind the resurgence of jazz-influenced sounds in the UK. Raised in a creative environment built by a set of Caribbean parents, her brand of afro-tinged Jazz has made her a key component in a string of new and established groups: from work with MOBO Award-winning drummer, Moses Boyd, legendary Jungle producer and toaster, Congo Natty, through to her own works as part of…

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13 Jul: A Jaguar soul: My Guyanese – American childhood (Volume 1)

This true story covers Maja’s life from birth to age 17 and is written from her perspective. Scandinavian born Maja was essentially abandoned from birth, passed around among-st relatives then re-joined her parents at six months of age. A new chapter of life unfolded, as the family emigrated to Texas USA. A fresh start, full of promise as well as heartbreak, upheaval, midnight moves and globetrotting. Maja hones and heeds her Jaguar-like instincts, and intuition to forage her independent pathway in life, in all that she encounters, particularly in New York city and Guyana South America.

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13 Jul: A Troublesome Man: About the Life of Dr. Ptolemy Reid, Prime Minister of Guyana (1980?1984).

Herein is the life story of Ptolemy Alexander Reid, minister in the government and prime minister of Guyana between 1964 and 1984. Here is a record of Dr. Reid?s childhood and youthful years in Dartmouth, Essequibo, Guyana, an account of his educational endeavors, and the highlights of his experiences as a veterinarian, politician, and family man who maintained an ongoing love relationship with his place of birth. Dr. Reid said of himself, ?I am a troublesome man ? always troublesome. I grew up troublesome.? In this book, you will see that he was troublesome all for the good, deserving to be remembered as a hero of Guyana.

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13 Jul: The Coloured Girl in the Ring: A Guyanese Woman Remembers

The Coloured Girl in the Ring: A Guyanese Woman Remembers is a fictional exploration of a young Black woman’s coming of age in British Guiana of the late fifties and early sixties. Told against the backdrop of political and racial turbulence, the novel employs a first-person narrative format and proffers a well defined portrait of the main character’s recollection of her family life, her oppressive school teachers, her friends’ doomed inter-racial romance and her thoughts on race and identity. As the central character matures, she faces painful choices about her future and her need to explore the world around her. Colourful local characters, careful twists, and vivid descriptions of British Guianese life combine to render an original portrayal of the Caribbean woman’s transition into adulthood.

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13 Jul: Memory and Myth: Postcolonial Religion in Contemporary Guyanese Fiction and Poetry. (Cross Cultures: Readings in the Post / Colonial Literatures in English)

This book investigates the problematical historical location of the term ‘religion’ and examines how this location has affected the analytical reading of postcolonial fiction and poetry. The adoption of the term ‘religion’ outside of a Western Enlightenment and Christian context should therefore be treated with caution. Within postcolonial literary criticism, there has been either a silencing of the category as a result of this caution or an uncritical and essentializing adoption of the term ‘religion’. It is argued in the present study that a vital aspect of how writers articulate their histories of colonial contact, migration, slavery, and the re-forging of identities in the wake of these histories is illuminated by the classificatory term ‘religion’. Aspects of postcolonial theory and Religious Studies theory are combined to provide fresh insights into the literature, thereby expanding the field of postcolonial literary criticism. The way in which writers ‘remember’ history through writing is central to the way in which ‘religion’ is theorized and articulated; the act of remembrance can be persuasively interpreted in terms of ‘religion’. The title ‘Memory and Myth’ therefore refers to both the syncretic mythology of Guyana, and the key themes in a new critical understanding of ‘religion’. Particular attention is devoted to Wilson Harris’s novel Jonestown, alongside theoretical and historical material on the actual Jonestown tragedy; to the mesmerizing effect of the Anancy tales on contemporary writers, particularly the poet John Agard; and to the work of the Indo-Guyanese writer David Dabydeen and his elusive character Manu.

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13 Jul: Wah Dih Story Seh?: An oral tradition in the Guyanese village of Buxton (GloBUNTU Books)

Wah Dih Story Seh?

Do you tell and (re) tell stories you grew up hearing? Do your children tune you out when you tell those “ole time stories”? Do they ask more questions than you can answer, especially if you live in the diaspora?? If this is your story, this book is for you. Take a journey across the globe with Uncle Edwin, Marlon, and Waddy the Water Frog (in Guyana). Kay (in New York), Dee (in Antigua), Prince Fuareke (one of the main storytellers from the “Africa For Smart Kids” book series) in in Cameroon. Dear reader, these conversations are yours to take off these pages into the world at the prompting of the ubiquitous, Waddy the Water Frog. Let’s get talking!